New Yorker Alex Emanuel tours band’s iconic London landmarks

The Rolling Stones hyped their career-spanning exhibit Exhibitionism by flying New York ‘superfan’ Alex Emanuel for a surprise meet-and-greet. “I suppose I can die now,” Emanuel says in the clip, after shaking hands with Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood.

Exhibitionism encompasses two floors at Saatchi Gallery. The exhibit features stage clothing, classic album artwork, vintage gear, photography, stage designs, personal diaries, behind-the-scenes footage, a recreation of the band’s first apartment and more. “The Rolling Stones are the greatest rock and roll band of all-time,” Emanuel said. “There’s a sense of self-confidence that they have, which is kind of unparalleled in other bands.”

Exhibitionism curator Ileen Gallagher offered Rolling Stone a tour of the gallery, which will run until September 4th and hit other cities in the future.

“The band was interested in doing something thematic that really wasn’t a chronological presentation, for obvious reasons,” she said. “When you begin in the Sixties and you’ve been going for over 50 years, it kind of has this crescendo and then this downward slope [Laughs]. They wanted their career to be explored thematically, and I think that was definitely the right decision. It allows you to kind of explore these rich topics and their history very cohesively.”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/watch-rolling-stones-surprise-superfan-at-exhibitionism-gallery-20160516#ixzz48xp5U3iL
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Source: Watch Rolling Stones Surprise Superfan at ‘Exhibitionism’ Gallery

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How to Write – StumbleUpon

Posted May 4, 2016 By rariccardi

9261a7e7b8e84928f02b63527a2f1a25Source: How to Write – StumbleUpon

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Or rather, DON’T hack any paid WiFi hotspots, as that would be bad…

Also, don’t turn your WiFi card off and then back on again after the hack to rectify any MAC address conflicts that might arise.

The commands are:

ifconfig en1 | grep ether
arp -a
sudo ifconfig en1 ether [mac address to spoof]

Note that the term “MAC address” has nothing to do with Macintosh computers. All computers, including Windows machines, have MAC addresses. This address is unique to your computer, but can be changed in software. The practice of copying someone else’s MAC address is referred to as “spoofing”. Spoofing a MAC address can get you through any MAC address filter, like the ones used by public WiFi hotspots.

Source: Hack any paid WiFi hotspot in about 30 seconds – StumbleUpon

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Everyone loves Netflix — at $9.99 a month, what’s not to love? True, Netflix doesn’t have Seinfeld and a bunch of other goodies that Hulu has. But $11.99 a month (commercial-free!) sounds doable, so go ahead and add Hulu to the mix. And obviously, you’ve gotta get your Game of Thrones on — that’s $14.99 a pop for HBO NOW. Um, totally worth it. Now throw in the money you pay for your Spotify subscription. Add up what you’ve spent on tickets to all those kick-ass movies in theaters so far this year. Big sports fan? What’s cable going for these days?

It costs a lot to get great content. And yes, it’s worth it — there’s a lot of great content out there to be got. But the cord-cutter movement is in full swing, and if we’ve learned anything from the Napsters and Pirate Bays of the world, it’s that people will always find clever ways to score stuff for free that suckers like us will otherwise pay for.

Enter Kodi, the cord cutter’s paradise. Formally known as XBMC, Kodi is a buzzword amongst fanatic binge-watchers, evoking a magical portal that opens up a seemingly endless universe of content and broadcasts it to your HDTV or laptop screen, without any restrictions, and without any payment. Yeah. It’s totally free. It’s not exactly mainstream — downloading and using Kodi takes more technical skill than the average streamer probably has — but Kodi has a tight-knit community of users who freely circulate tips and tricks.

But is it illegal? Technically, no. There’s nothing actually on it. Mmhmm.

Source: Kodi Black Market Netflix Is the Ultimate Streaming Hack

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I am a freak for the American road trip. And I’m not alone, as some of this country’s best writers have taken a shot at describing that quintessentially American experience. “There is no such knowledge of the nation as comes of traveling in it, of seeing eye to eye its vast extent, its various and teeming wealth, and, above all, its purpose-full people,” the newspaper editor Samuel Bowles wrote 150 years ago inAcross the Continent, arguably the first true American road-trip book.

The above map is the result of a painstaking and admittedly quixotic effort to catalog the country as it has been described in the American road-tripping literature. It includes every place-name reference in 12 books about cross-country travel, from Mark Twain’s Roughing It (1872) to Cheryl Strayed’s Wild (2012), and maps the authors’ routes on top of one another. You can track an individual writer’s descriptions of the landscape as they traveled across it, or you can zoom in to see how different authors have written about the same place at different times.

Most interestingly of all, for me at least, you can ruminate about what those differences say about American travel, American writing, American history.

A word to close readers: I hand-typed most of these 1,500-plus entries and located their coordinates as best I could. Some were difficult to track down. I beg forbearance if you, a hermit in the mountains of Wyoming, find that I have pinned Mark Twain’s reference to Horse Creek in a place where it could not have been, or if you, a denizen of what Tom Wolfe rather unkindly called “the Rat lands” of Mexico, find my estimation of the precise location of Chicalote, Aguascalientes, somewhat inexact.

To be included, a book needed to have a narrative arc matching the chronological and geographical arc of the trip it chronicles. It needed to be non-fictional, or, as in the case of On the Road, at least told in the first-person. To anticipate a few objections: Lolita’s road-trip passages are scattered and defiant of cartographical order; The Grapes of Wrath’s are brief compared to the sections about poverty and persecution in California; the length of the trip in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas is short in the geographical sense even if it is prodigiously vast in every other; and yes,The Dharma Bums is On the Road’s equal in every respect, and if you want to map the place-name references in all of Kerouac’s books, I salute you.

These passed the test:

Wild, Cheryl Strayed. 2012. After a series of personal crises, the author hits the Pacific Crest Trail and walks from Southern California to Portland. Self-actualization ensues.

The Cruise of the Rolling Junk, F. Scott Fitzgerald. 1934. Scott and Zelda’s wacky adventures along the muddy, unkept roads of the mid-Atlantic and the South, as they drive from Connecticut to her hometown of Montgomery, Alabama.

Rolling Nowhere: Riding the Rails With America’s Hoboes, Ted Conover. 1984. Conover, our most accomplished method journalist, studies with a merciful lack of sentimentality a subculture of transients that has long been mourned and romanticized more than it has been loved or even tolerated.

A Walk Across America, Peter Jenkins. 1979. Jenkins and his dog Cooper hoof it to New Orleans from upstate New York; along the way they encounter poverty, racism, hippies, illness, hateful cops and—at least for one of them—violent vehicular death. Oh, and in Mobile, Alabama, God.

Cross Country: Fifteen Years and 90,000 Miles on the Roads and Interstates of America with Lewis and Clark, Robert Sullivan. 2006. As much a free-association history of the American road trip as the chronicle of one in particular, Sullivan’s book is rare in that it documents a time-restricted straight-shot across the continent, interstates and chain-motels and all. Abandon nostalgia, all ye who enter here.

The Lost Continent, Bill Bryson. 1989. A sneering account of this exile’s return from abroad and his re-acquaintance with his native country. Bryson seems to be reminded on almost every page of why he chose to leave it, and we of why we let him.

Blue Highways: A Journey into America, William Least Heat Moon. 1982. Not less critical of America and Americans than Bryson but more interestingly so, the author takes his van on the road for three months after separating from his wife and sticks only to smaller highways while avoiding the cities. He has long debates about local history and current affairs with people on the road and pays especial attention to quirky place-names–a traveler after my own heart.

On the Road, Jack Kerouac. 1957. Sal Paradise and Dean Moriarty search for bop, kicks, speed and the night.

Roughing It, Mark Twain. 1872. Twain’s book about his journey west by stagecoach a decade earlier is a incredible account of transcontinental travel before the railroad made it infinitely easier; his sections about the early Mormons in Salt Lake City, the mining settlements in Nevada and the pre-Americanized Sandwich Islands–aka, Hawaii–are also well worth the read.

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Robert Pirsig. 1974. The author and his son ride by motorcycle to California; Profound Philosophical Ruminations ensue. Very 1970s.

Travels with Charley, John Steinbeck. 1962. The aging novelist, his black-poodle pooch and Rocinante, the customized van named after Don Quixote’s horse, light out for the territories; Charley discovers redwoods, which depress him; Steinbeck discovers that you can’t go home again.

The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Tom Wolfe. 1968. Ken Kesey and the highly-acidic Merry Pranksters take the bus Further across the country to “tootle” its citizens out of lethargy. Neal Cassady rides again.

*Update, 7/22: An earlier version of the story had the wrong publication dates for Blue Highways and The Lost Continent

Source: The Obsessively Detailed Map of American Literature’s Most Epic Road Trips

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“Ask Me, Don’t Tell Me,” an amazing short film that I learned about through the Bernal Heights History Project, shows a glimpse of San Francisco street life in the late 1950s. (The film was published in 1961, but the aesthetic of its “juvenile delinquents” seems to owe more to the 50s, so let’s call it that. The 60s in San Francisco brings to mind flower children, which these aren’t.) It’s got some dated moments, but sparkles nonetheless as a little historical treasure.

The film is more interesting to me for its poetic pastiche of street scenes (and gritty bongos-infused blues) than it is as a record of the program, Youth For Service, that it was made to promote. I’ve never seen anything like this, nor have I read very much about these scenes in San Francisco. But as I watched the clip, I felt like I knew this world, if obliquely. These young men were the progenitors of the San Franciscans I grew up around. In their gestures, their expressions, their postures, and their voices, they foreshadow the later Bay Area culture with which I’m much more familiar.

Source: The gangs of San Francisco: remarkable footage from the late 1950s | Eamon Kircher-Allen

       

If you support our community and developers, stop encouraging YouTubers by watching their videos, they are destorying our hard work!

We regret to inform you that the TV Time addon has now been voluntarily taken offline due to the misguided actions of certain YouTubers. In case you never had the chance to use TV Time, it was literally the best live television streaming add-on that our community has ever seen, it gave reliable high quality access to all the major American television networks, until we were forced to shut it down that is.

What happened to TV Time is not only a problem for TV Time, it is a problem that plagues our community and threatens to destroy everything we’ve worked so hard to create. Basically what happened is that we released the TV Time add-on, people loved it, but then some YouTubers decided to bring negative attention to it by making videos, and even worse, they revealed the source of the content. Once they let the cat out of the bag and revealed the source of TV Time’s content, the developer of the addon had no choice but to close it for good.

We don’t deny that these YouTube videos may be useful to some, but they are doing way more harm than good. Anything that is explained in a YouTube video was already put into a guide on our web site long before. Bringing attention to our add-ons on a mainstream site like YouTube (which is owned by a major American media corporation) is just asking for trouble.

Kodi is being given a bad name and our addons are being killed by YouTubers who feel the need to publicize it over the wrong mediums. It is one thing for someone to visit our offshore-hosted web site and slowly discover Kodi and our unofficial addons, but it is a whole other thing to upload a video to one of the biggest web sites in the world, promoting Kodi as something it is not.

If you look through our site, we explain how to install Kodi, how to install add-ons, but we don’t go through and tell you specifically what you can watch through these add-ons and how they work. Some things are better left unsaid, if it works it works, there’s no reason to start making YouTube videos about it and bring unwanted attention. It is the kind of attention that YouTubers are bringing that causes sites to change their code in order break our add-ons, and even worse, could potentially bring legal heat in the future.

As for the open source Kodi media player itself, these YouTubers are making it seem like Kodi was made specifically for use with addons, which it was not. They are giving Kodi a bad name and are infuriating the official development team as a result. Next time think twice about sharing the link to a Kodi-related YouTube video and remember that the majority of these YouTubers are simply profiteers, and not friends of our community.

Source: YouTubers Killed TV Time (and Are Slowly Killing Kodi Too)

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Lesser-known Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak recently sat down with Reddit for a video interview, and a more traditional AMA. Among the nuggets of wisdom: the Apple Watch lineup is “too complicated”, and Apple’s garage origins is partly a myth.

There’s a few good, hard-hitting questions in the AMA that Wozniak took the time to answer. The ongoing saga between Apple and the DOJ is at the front of everyone’s mind, and Woz didn’t pull punches:

I was brought up in a time when communist Russia under Stalin was thought to be, everybody is spied on, everybody is looked into, every little thing can get you secretly thrown into prison. And, no. We had our Bill of Rights. And it’s just dear to me. The Bill of Rights says some bad people won’t do certain bad things because we’re protecting humans to live as humans.

So, I come from the side of personal liberties. But there are also other problems. Twice in my life I wrote things that could have been viruses. I threw away every bit of source code. I just got a chill inside. These are dangerous, dangerous things, and if some code gets written in an Apple product that lets people in, bad people are going to find their way to it, very likely.

Woz also has praise for how Tim Cook is handling the company, saying that he’s continuing the “strong tradition that Steve Jobs was known for of making good products that help people do things they want to do in their life”.

 But he also thinks the Apple Watch lineup has flaws: while he wears an Apple Watch day-to-day, he complains about the number of products in the lineup: “Twenty watches from $500 to $1100. The band’s the only difference?”

The biggest revelation comes at the beginning of the interview, however, where he dispels the “myth” that Apple was founded in a garage. It’s well worth a watch, and the AMA has some surprisingly candid information about how to start a company, and why he left Apple.

Source: Steve Wozniak: Apple Wasn’t Really Founded In a Garage

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A video editor has added Dire Straits’ hit to the endings to many classic movies.

The end of The Godfather is one of the most famous closing scenes in movie history, with Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) surrounded by his henchmen while his wife Kay (Diane Keaton) watches from another room in isolation as Nino Rota’s score swells. Now imagine if Dire Straits‘ “Walk of Life” had been used in its place. Think no more, because it’s embedded above.

Paleofuture has discovered something called the Walk of Life Project, where a video editor and writer named Peter Salomone is adding “Walk of Life” to the end of many films under the premise that it is “the perfect song to end any movie.” In addition to The Godfather, to date he’s tacked it on to the end of such past and modern classics as Casablanca, Easy Rider and Mad Max: Fury Road. Even Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, which — spoiler alert — ends with the world being blown up in a nuclear war, gets the treatment. We’ve also embedded the ending of The Graduate below, but you can see them all at the Walk of Life Project’s YouTube channel.

“My friend joked that ‘Walk of Life’ would be the perfect funeral song,” Salomone told Paleofuture. “So then I just sort of melded that idea with my love of movie endings. I tried a few (Star Wars, 2001, and The Matrix) and I was surprised at how well they synced up. I didn’t re-edit the movie clips visually. I just found a good starting point for the song and the rest just fell into place.”

“Walk of Life” appeared on Dire Straits’ 1985 blockbuster, Brothers in Arms. The fourth single from the album, it reached No. 7 in the U.S. and No. 2 in the U.K.

Source: Can Dire Straits’ ‘Walk of Life’ Be Used as the End Music to Every Movie?

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By Matt Branham Sep 01, 2015

It’s not always easy to understand the entire plot of a movie your first time through, especially with the person next to you squawking in your ear and the jackass behind you kicking your seat. Sometimes we’re smart enough to save highly anticipated movies for home viewing, but even then, there are a number of films you have to watch more than once to fully comprehend what the hell is going on. Here are ten movies very deserving of a second viewing, and you’ll be glad you watched them again. (WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD)

Source: 10 Films You Have To Watch More Than Once To Get And Fully Appreciate – Mandatory

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