Actors Archive

New Yorker Alex Emanuel tours band’s iconic London landmarks

The Rolling Stones hyped their career-spanning exhibit Exhibitionism by flying New York ‘superfan’ Alex Emanuel for a surprise meet-and-greet. “I suppose I can die now,” Emanuel says in the clip, after shaking hands with Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Ronnie Wood.

Exhibitionism encompasses two floors at Saatchi Gallery. The exhibit features stage clothing, classic album artwork, vintage gear, photography, stage designs, personal diaries, behind-the-scenes footage, a recreation of the band’s first apartment and more. “The Rolling Stones are the greatest rock and roll band of all-time,” Emanuel said. “There’s a sense of self-confidence that they have, which is kind of unparalleled in other bands.”

Exhibitionism curator Ileen Gallagher offered Rolling Stone a tour of the gallery, which will run until September 4th and hit other cities in the future.

“The band was interested in doing something thematic that really wasn’t a chronological presentation, for obvious reasons,” she said. “When you begin in the Sixties and you’ve been going for over 50 years, it kind of has this crescendo and then this downward slope [Laughs]. They wanted their career to be explored thematically, and I think that was definitely the right decision. It allows you to kind of explore these rich topics and their history very cohesively.”

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/watch-rolling-stones-surprise-superfan-at-exhibitionism-gallery-20160516#ixzz48xp5U3iL
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Source: Watch Rolling Stones Surprise Superfan at ‘Exhibitionism’ Gallery

2 Comments so far. Join the Conversation

A video editor has added Dire Straits’ hit to the endings to many classic movies.

The end of The Godfather is one of the most famous closing scenes in movie history, with Michael Corleone (Al Pacino) surrounded by his henchmen while his wife Kay (Diane Keaton) watches from another room in isolation as Nino Rota’s score swells. Now imagine if Dire Straits‘ “Walk of Life” had been used in its place. Think no more, because it’s embedded above.

Paleofuture has discovered something called the Walk of Life Project, where a video editor and writer named Peter Salomone is adding “Walk of Life” to the end of many films under the premise that it is “the perfect song to end any movie.” In addition to The Godfather, to date he’s tacked it on to the end of such past and modern classics as Casablanca, Easy Rider and Mad Max: Fury Road. Even Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, which — spoiler alert — ends with the world being blown up in a nuclear war, gets the treatment. We’ve also embedded the ending of The Graduate below, but you can see them all at the Walk of Life Project’s YouTube channel.

“My friend joked that ‘Walk of Life’ would be the perfect funeral song,” Salomone told Paleofuture. “So then I just sort of melded that idea with my love of movie endings. I tried a few (Star Wars, 2001, and The Matrix) and I was surprised at how well they synced up. I didn’t re-edit the movie clips visually. I just found a good starting point for the song and the rest just fell into place.”

“Walk of Life” appeared on Dire Straits’ 1985 blockbuster, Brothers in Arms. The fourth single from the album, it reached No. 7 in the U.S. and No. 2 in the U.K.

Source: Can Dire Straits’ ‘Walk of Life’ Be Used as the End Music to Every Movie?

2 Comments so far. Join the Conversation

By Matt Branham Sep 01, 2015

It’s not always easy to understand the entire plot of a movie your first time through, especially with the person next to you squawking in your ear and the jackass behind you kicking your seat. Sometimes we’re smart enough to save highly anticipated movies for home viewing, but even then, there are a number of films you have to watch more than once to fully comprehend what the hell is going on. Here are ten movies very deserving of a second viewing, and you’ll be glad you watched them again. (WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD)

Source: 10 Films You Have To Watch More Than Once To Get And Fully Appreciate – Mandatory

2 Comments so far. Join the Conversation

How Does ‘Vinyl’ Stack Up Against the Real Deal?

Posted February 15, 2016 By rariccardi

Jimmy Page at Led Zeppelin’s legendary Madison Square Garden gig in 1973. The concert is recreated briefly in the pilot for HBO’s rock drama ‘Vinyl.’ David Redfern/Getty

Author of NYC-music book ‘Love Goes to Buildings on Fire’ offers an annotated guide to HBO show’s real-life events
 By

Much like Mad Men, half the fun of Vinyl is in the trainspotting. The art direction is remarkable: historic venues are recreated with awesome attention to detail, real-life-rock-star doppelgangers swagger through scenes,  and all manner of Seventies fashion disasters are reanimated. And the soundtrack, similarly true to the time, is a brilliant mix of the inspirational and the insipid. Here’s a cheat sheet on some of the facts behind the fictions.

Led Zeppelin Plays Madison Square Garden, 1973
TV Version: In the show’s pilot, set in 1973, Richie Finestra (Bobby Cannavale) visits Robert Plant at the Garden to talk him into signing with his label. Later, we see cameras filming as the band blasts through “Somethin’ Else.”

 Real Story: Zep played three sold-out shows at the Garden in July 1973, shot for the concert doc The Song Remains the Same.

The Man Known as “Maury Gold”
TV Version:
Finestra’s first boss, seen in flashbacks, is a label owner with ties to thugs with Italian surnames.

Real Story: The character is likely based on Morris Levy, the notorious boss of Roulette Records. Levy had links to the Genovese crime family and allegedly terrified and swindled Tommy James.

Source: How Does ‘Vinyl’ Stack Up Against the Real Deal?

2 Comments so far. Join the Conversation

Tony Zhou’s latest begins with a few stern words from Samuel L. Jackson about his intense dislike for having to repeat his performance over and over for multiple angles of coverage. Given that The Hateful Eight is nothing if not an exercise in ensemble staging, it’s timely that that’s the intro for Zhou’s examination of how this technique works in Bong Joon-ho’s masterful Memories of Murder. Much to chew on here, as ever.

 

Source: “Too Much Coverage is Exhausting, Especially for the Actors”: Tony Zhou on Ensemble Staging | Filmmaker Magazine

2 Comments so far. Join the Conversation

Bill Murray will star in the upcoming comedy Rock the Kasbah, and in this exclusive video, we get the rocking backstory on the comedian’s character. The faux-documentary Richie Lanz: The Man and the Music provides a glimpse into the life of Murray’s audacious, hilariously unstable rock manager, who after years of being out of the spotlight travels to Afghanistan to visit his last remaining client but ends up stumbling on “music’s next gamechanger.

As the mockumentary shows, Lanz was once at the center of many of music’s greatest moments, from giving Madonna her famed moniker and saving Woodstock (“Jimi Hendrix played ‘The Star-Spangled Banner’ because I asked him to,” Lanz boasts) to telling Slash he should wear a top hat onstage. “He looked at me like he was gonna hit me,” Lanz says. The video also features Lanz remembrances by Willie Nelson and Steven Van Zandt, who reveals that the idea to wear a bandana came from the manager.

However, the ensuing decades aren’t kind to Lanz as he alienates his huge stable of talent. “Richie changed my life. Actually, he ruined my life,” Jenny Lewis tells The Man and the Music. Lanz’s downfall takes him to Afghanistan –”I go to Afghanistan to do something for our troops,” he says – which then sets him on a path to redemption after discovering a young Afghan girl with a superstar voice.

“Rock n’ roll has certainly been very, very good to me,” Lanz says. “If you’re really looking for something that is pure and sacred, you’ll converge with other pure and sacred people.

“The Barry Levinson-directed Rock the Kasbah was penned by former Crawdaddy writer Mitch Glazer – Glazer and Murray previously teamed for the Christmas classic Scrooged – and co-stars Zooey Deschanel, Danny McBride, Bruce Willis and Kate Hudson. Rock the Kasbah is set to hit theaters October 23rd through Open Road Films.

Source: Watch Bill Murray in Faux Rock Doc: ‘I Told Slash to Wear a Hat’ | Rolling Stone

Illustration by Wesley Bedrosian

From the C-suite to the caterers on their feet: Information gleaned from the Sony hack, and reporting on comparable studios, give a glimpse into the paydays on studio film shoots.

This story first appeared in the Oct. 9 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

“People in this business are always looking at other people and comparing,” says a top Hollywood attorney. “I always have clients calling me and saying, ‘Am I being paid enough? Should I be paid more?’ ”

Luckily for all, there’s lots of comparing to do in THR‘s second annual What Hollywood Earns report. To research the salaries of everyone from key grips to movie stars, the magazine consulted with executives, producers, payroll service companies, the industry guilds and others who have inside information about how and where the money is flowing in 2015 (including a horse farm in upstate New York that “FedExes” its animal actors to Hollywood shooting locations). This year, thanks to North Korean cybercriminals, there were other sources as well — the thousands of emails and employment contracts that spilled Hollywood salary secrets all over the Internet during last November’s Sony hack.

The takeaway? TV producing fees are up (to as much as $75,000 an episode), Meryl Streep gets rich even from flops ($5 million for Ricki and the Flash?), and extras love it when it rains.

WHO MAKES WHAT ON THE LOT

Studio Tour Guide

Yukking it up with tourists around the lot pays $26 an hour, but only after a training period during which compensation is $20 an hour.

Television Actor

Newcomers can expect to earn just $15,000 to $20,000 per episode on a network or cable series. Experienced actors take home as much as $75,000 to $100,000 an episode, and bigger stars can earn $150,000 to topline a series in its first season. Raises (usually about 4 percent) come each subsequent season (James Spader made $160,000 per episode for season two of The Blacklist;Jeff Garlin made $84,000 per episode on season two of The Goldbergs), but the real money comes after contract renegotiations (usually for season 3). In breakout success, the stars of hit shows eventually can earn as much as a cool $1 million an episode (The Big Bang Theory‘sJohnny Galecki and Jim Parsons).

Film Writer

Established movie scribes can make $1 million a script, plus a bonus if they get final credit. Selling a spec screenplay can range from the low-six figures to $3 million (what Sony paid James Vanderbilt for White House Down) or more. The most lucrative work can come via rewrites or touch-ups, where bankable script doctors can make $500,000 for just a few weeks of effort.

Craft Services

Dispensing celery sticks and Twizzlers to the cast and crew earns these workers about $1,200 a week.

Television Writer

Staff writers can start at WGA scale — $37,368 for an hourlong script, $25,408 for a half-hour — or earn $7,000 to $15,000 an episode in weekly fees. Seasoned scribes also get episodic producing fees of $20,000 to $30,000, even for episodes they don’t write. Raises come in subsequent seasons.

Gaffer

They make $45 an hour and work 10 to 15 weeks per film.

Film Producer

On-the-lot overhead deals have been squeezed, but for a studio release, seasoned producers can make $1.5 million to $2 million upfront and often much more in backend (though first-dollar-gross deals are nearly extinct.) Will Smith and James Lassiter’s Overbrook Entertainment made $2 million for producing last year’s Annie.

Publicist

A unit publicist hired by a studio earns about $2,750 a week, or $41,000 per film. Personal publicists employed by stars earn much more, with some making $400,000 or more a year.

TV Show Creator

They make most of their money in producing fees, with raises in subsequent seasons. Vince Gilligan got $50,000 per episode of Better Call Saul, Jon Bokenkamp earned $37,500 per episode for season two of The Blacklist, and Adam Goldberg got $50,000 per episode for season two ofThe Goldbergs.

Film Actor

A-list stars still can make between $5 million (Meryl Streep’s pay for Ricki and the Flash) and $20 million (what Denzel Washington got upfront for The Equalizer) to much more with backend (Robert Downey Jr. reportedly made $50 million for The Avengers). Supporting actors don’t fare as well (Kevin Kline made $350,000 for his part in Ricki).

First AD

First assistant directors get paid about $8,000 a week and generally work 15 to 20 weeks on a major shoot, for a total of $120,000 to $160,000 per film.

Script Supervisor

They get paid about $40 an hour and typically work 12 days on an hourlong TV drama, taking home $7,000 an episode.

Supporting Actor

Sidekicks, next-door neighbors and other nonstarring TV roles pay in the mid-five figures per episode. Jonathan Banks got $65,000 per episode on Better Call Saul‘s first season, and the kids on season two of The Goldbergs earned $20,000 to $25,000 each.

Warm-Up Comedian

Those super-pumped comics who keep studio audiences entertained before TV tapings get paid $3,000 to $5,000 a show.

Studio Chief

Running a studio pays a base salary of $3 million to $5 million (what Jeff Robinov reportedly got at Warner Bros.), but bonuses can bring the amount to the mid-eight figures.

DP

The director of photography makes $10,000 to $20,000 a week on a 15-week shoot. A few, likeRoger Deakins, earn much more ($30,000 or more).

Film Director

Studio paychecks range from $500,000 (what newcomer J Blakeson got for The 5th Wave) to $3 million (what Sony offered Danny Boyle for Steve Jobs) to much more (Michael Bay reportedly earns $80 million from backend on Transformers movies).

Makeup Artist

They earn about $60 an hour and work about 14 weeks per film.

TV Cameraman

Lead camera operators make $75 an hour, or about $8,000 for an hourlong drama episode (which takes eight days to shoot; sitcoms are about five days and pay less).

TV Director

Directors of hourlong dramas make about $42,000 an episode; sitcom directors earn $35,000. But direct a pilot and you’ll get paid for every future episode, even if you never set foot on set again. Joe Carnahan, who directed the pilot for The Blacklist, got a $5,000 check for every episode of the latest season.

TV Studio Chief

Sony’s Steve Mosko earned $2.8 million (plus bonuses) as president, with execs that oversee both a studio and a network potentially making more.

Head of Distribution

Typical base pay is nearly $1 million (plus bonus). The person with this title at Sony, for instance, makes $885,000.

CFO

The top bean counters earn a lot of beans: Sony’s financial chief makes $900,000 a year, not including bonuses.

Production Chief

He or she usually earns about $1 million a year, though Michael De Luca was making more than his Sony co-worker with the same title, Hannah Minghella ($1.5 million vs. $900,000).

General Counsel

The top attorney at a studio can expect to earn in the high-six figures. Sony’s top lawyer earns a base salary of $800,000 plus bonuses.

Head of Marketing

The job usually pays about $1 million a year. Sometimes more if the executive is heavily recruited.

… AND ON LOCATION

Stunt Horse

They earn up to $1,000 a day ($500 for a “background horse”) but can cost studios much more in transport fees (the farm in upstate New York that provided horses for The Patriot and Winter’s Tale says they’ve even “FedExed” horses to sets).

Stunt Person

Most get paid $889 a day, or about $50,000 a film, if they work every day of a 12-week shoot (and don’t break a leg). But they pay for their own insurance.

Second Unit Director

The director responsible for shooting stunts and other supplementary footage, usually on location, earns about $20,000 a week.

Extras

These unsung actors earn about $150 a day, or $200 if they’re wearing a hairpiece or working in rain or smoke.

Wig Maker

The craftsman who gives Bruce Willis and Nicolas Cage full heads of hair gets paid about $1,500 a week.

Location Manager

They make about $3,000 a week but work many more weeks than most of the crew and cast — as many as 30 weeks per film.

Driver

Piloting a StarWagon pays between $30 and $36 an hour.

Prop Master

The person in charge of the fake swords and alien artifacts makes $45 an hour, usually working 20 weeks on a film (including preproduction).

Costume Designer

Pay rates range from $3,000 a day up to $12,000 or more, depending on the size of the film and the experience of the designer. Renee Kalfus earned $6,500 a week for Annie, while David Robinson got $4,500 a week for The Equalizer.

Source: Hollywood Salaries Revealed: Who Makes What on the Lot and on Location – Hollywood Reporter

2 Comments so far. Join the Conversation

They Made New York

Posted September 29, 2015 By rariccardi

Twenty-eight legends of the Downtown scene — including Philip Glass, Larry Kramer, Chuck Close and Iman — gather in SoHo for a special portrait.

On July 14, 2015, T magazine assembled some of the artists, writers, performers, musicians and intellectuals who defined New York’s inimitable and electrifying cultural scene of the late 1970s and early ’80s. There were longtime friends (and some rivals) in the group, but overall, the mood was one of celebration. And why not? Every generation thinks it’s uniquely special, but this generation really is: These are the people who came to, and stayed in, New York when it was at its worst, and in so doing, created what was arguably the most important multidisciplinary artistic movement that the city has ever seen.

But while this historic gathering was notable for its presences, it was equally so for its absences: a whole group of people (the artists David Wojnarowicz, Peter Hujar, Robert Mapplethorpe, Keith Haring, Tseng Kwong Chi and Felix Gonzalez-Torres among them) who were lost to AIDS. Those who remain are survivors — of a plague, of time and, most of all, of the wonders and the ravages of the era.

Source: They Made New York

3 Comments so far. Join the Conversation


Paramount’s remake of “The Gambler” is sort of made in that spirit. 1974’s “The Gambler” directed by Karel Reisz and starring James Caan and Lauren Hutton is quite good. But it’s been totally forgotten, which makes it ripe for a remake as well. Sure, they’re still remaking a good movie, but it’s a movie that even a lot of cinephiles don’t know.And so the trailer for 2014’s “The Gambler” is here, The film is directed by Rupert Wyatt, who made his name on the successful “Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes,” and stars Mark Wahlberg, Brie Larson, Michael K. Williams and Jessica Lange. Written by William Monahan “The Departed”, the movie is based on the original script written by James Toback he remains an executive producer.

via Watch: First Red Band Trailer For ‘The Gambler’ Starring | The Playlist.

Be the first to comment

The White Russian – A Kahlúa Production – YouTube

Posted September 3, 2014 By rariccardi

The White Russian – A Kahlúa Production – YouTube.

Be the first to comment